• Georgia uses methods of winemaking that you couldn’t invent in the modern world; you could only inherit them through the mists of time…


    Oz Clarke, The History of Wine in 100 Bottles

  • Georgia’s winemakers are the guardians of wine’s oldest traditions...


    Andrew Jefford, wine writer, Financial Times

  • A great Saperavi is shockingly good; no other words will do.


    Andrew Jefford, wine writer in Financial Times

  • Wine is the Georgians’ poetry and their folklore, their religion and their daily bread


    Alice Feiring

Latest Articles

San Francisco Chronicle

The Bay Area’s first Georgian restaurant shines with cheese pulls and chokhas

Aug 16 2019

There are thousands of restaurants in the Bay Area, but as far as I know, only one has the famous Georgian khachapuri. Bevri cranks them out alongside other Georgian specialties and an extensive list of clay pot-fermented wines to pair them with...

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San Francisco Chronicle

Yes, Georgian wine is worth the hype and yes, you should be drinking it

Aug 15 2019

Georgia invented wine, as far as anyone can tell, with a history stretching back 8,000 years, and the techniques haven’t changed very much since then. Traditional Georgian winemakers still age their wines in large clay vessels called qvevri, which they bury underground. The white wines are fermented with their skins for months, resulting in powerful tannins and a dark amber color. “Orange wine” doesn’t begin to capture it. The grapes are indigenous varieties — Tsolikouri, Krakhuna, Mtsvane — rather than the bland-sounding, internationally recognizable Chardonnay or Merlot. The process is largely preindustrial, done without synthetic chemicals in the vineyard or the winery...

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San Francisco Chronicle

In Sonoma, a natural winemaker looks to the Republic of Georgia for inspiration

Aug 15 2019

Caleb Leisure is the only American winemaker fermenting his wines in bona fide Georgian qvevri...

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