They are meditative wines, sumptuous and subtle.


Andrew Jefford, wine writer in Financial Times

At the intersection of history, culture, and wine grape variety lies a region referred to as the “Cradle of Wine.” Georgia, about a 5-hour flight due west of Rome, and resting at the same latitude as the Oregon/California border, boasts a climate and terrains well suited for the cultivation of wine grapes. 

Situated at the crossroads between Europe and Asia, Georgia is recognized as the oldest winemaking country in the world. Archaeological evidence suggests that Georgia has completed more than 8,000 vintages—an enduring history that has given rise to more than 500 indigenous grape varieties across ten distinct winegrowing regions.  

With its variety of grapes and winemaking practices, Georgia offers the wine-drinker an unparalleled range of tastes: some unique, some familiar, and some nearly impossible to describe. As winemakers continue to explore and experiment with the country’s native grape varieties, more distinctive and unique wines will continue to emerge from the region. 

 

 

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